Fili-Bernie

December 12, 2010 | Blog

I’ve officially given this blog over to Bernie Sanders. Well, not really. But I can’t think of an issue more fundamental in defining who we are as Americans and more important to our nation’s economic and educational future than what Bernie discussed in his old-school, non-filibuster filibuster on Friday. Economic justice — along with sensible tax policy — is something too few on Capitol Hill and too few Americans care to consider. But it’s centrally related to the future educational outcomes of our people — research shows that socioeconomic factors are more important even than teacher quality, a frequent topic of my posts and a central feature of my professional work.

I note that former Labor Secretary and current Berkeley professor Robert Reich, in his Twitter feed (@RBReich) today, backs up a point I made about these proposed tax cuts being a precursor to Republican efforts to launch an assault on domestic spending and entitlements — using the federal budget deficit made so much worse by these tax cuts for millionaires and billionaires as their rationale.

I said: “I recognize that this issue isn’t specifically about education, but it is inexorably linked. Given President Obama’s apparent unwillingness to go to the mat for Democratic principles (and his own campaign pledge!), Republicans have succeeded in extending the Bush tax cuts for millionaires and billionaires — not just for the first $250,000 or $1,000,000 of their income, but all of it up to infinity. The total cost of all the proposal’s tax cuts is $900 billion. Republicans’ likely next step is too take off their “tax cutter” hat and don their “deficit hawk” cap, saying that the federal government is living beyond its means, and will fire away at domestic spending. You don’t think education will avoid being in their crosshairs at that time, do you? You know that this is more than simply a ploy to line the pockets of rich Americans, right? It’s part of a plan to bleed government dry and then argue that government programs need to be reduced, eliminated or privatized.”

Reich wrote: “$900 b tax cut w/ lion’s share for rich explodes deficit and makes future domestic discretionary spending sitting duck for R cuts.”

Yes, folks. This isn’t just about tax cuts for the richest Americans. This is but a front in the war to reduce the size of government regardless of its collateral damage to Americans who need government the most.

Economic inequality is already at an all-time high in this country — even higher than prior to the start of the Great Depression. Our educational system only has a finite amount of power to overcome such overwhelming inequities. If these forces are left unchecked, it may become an impossible job, especially as education programs themselves may fall victim to all-too-easily-predictable budget cuts.

The rich, on the the other hand, will continue to party like it’s 1929. Only the party’s even better this time ’round. So much for the national economy being a collective good.

1 Comment

  1. Reply

    Anonymous

    December 29, 2010

    Maybe, just maybe if the GOP is successful in reducing the size of the federal government it would have a positive unintended consequence...that would be bringing families (and extended families) back together to help each other...just saying...one of the challenges is the government is too helpful...maybe now families and neighbors will turn to each other...this could be a very good thing...


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